Collaborations

  • Countess Willie

    Sophisticated, dramatic, well-traveled, glamorous, and worldly, Countess Willie V. Piazza, owner of the French Studio, was a trendsetter in style and fashion. Countess Willie was an educated woman, a patron of the arts, and possessed an impressive library of rare volumes. She featured many historic jazz musicians in her House, including Tony Jackson and Jelly Roll Morton. Unlike many of her counterparts, she was known for having a kind heart and a generous, loving nature. She was fiercely protective: when a patron of her establishment, the nephew of a prominent New Orleans cleric, committed a heinous act of sadism against one of her ladies, Countess Willie shot him dead.

    Chocolate plum musk, red musk, amaretto, candied fruits, and red ginger.

    Out of Stock
  • Crib Girls

    Situated on of the lowest rungs in the Red Light District’s hierarchy, the crib girls solicited from their windows and doorways, entertaining their clients in sparsely furnished, dingy two-room apartments.

    Seven honeys under one unkempt roof, with fiery-tart cubeb and dusty cardamom.

    Out of Stock
  • Emma

    Better known as the “Parisian Queen of America,” needs little introduction in this country.

    Emma’s “House of all Nations,” as it is commonly called, is one place of amusement you can’t very well afford to miss while in the Tenderloin District. Everything goes here. Fun is the watchword.

    Business has been on such an increase at the above place of late that Mdme. Johnson had to occupy an “Annex.” Emma has never less than twenty pretty women of all nations, who are clever entertainers.

    Remember the name,

    Emma Johnson
    331 and 333 Basin Street

    Vanilla bourbon, tea rose, jasmine, pink pepper, and patchouli.

    Out of Stock
  • Hilma

    The amiable, ebullient proprietor of the Mirror Ballroom, where Jelly Roll Morton got his first gig.

    Miss Burt, while very young, is of a type that pleases most men of today – the witty, pretty, and natty – a lady of fashion.

    Her managerial possibilities are phenomenal, to say the least, and her success here has proven itself beyond a doubt.

    Miss Burt has been with us but a short while but has won all hearts. Her palace is second to none. It is good for one who loves the beautiful to visit Miss Burt’s handsome palace. There are no words for the ladies – one can only realize the grandeur of feminine beauty and artistic settings after an hour or so in the palace of Hilma Burt.

    Miss Burt, aside from having two handsome homes here, has one in St. Louis and one in Kansas City, Mo., where, it is said, she is as popular as in New Orleans.

    Don’t forget to converse with her, as she is very clever, jolly, and cultured.

    205 N. Basin

    Honeysuckle, Bulgarian rose, night blooming jasmine, sweet clove, cedarwood, black tea, and nectarine.

    Out of Stock
  • Josie

    The brooding, raucous, and hot-blooded proprietress of the Château Lobrano d’Arlington, the gaudiest bordello in the District. Miss Josie had a true talent for hype, and promoted her ladies in an effusively romanticized, over-the-top fashion. La Belle Stewart, who was in actuality a circus hoochie koochie girl from Chicago, was billed as “a bona-fide baroness, direct from the court of St. Petersburg.”

    Heady magnolia and honeyed peaches.

    Out of Stock
  • Lulu

    The Diamond Queen. An expert showman and entrepreneur, the eccentric Miss Lulu was the Mistress of Mahogany Hall until 1917. She invested heavily, but not always successfully, and at the end of her career as a madam, wanted to fund production houses for the budding movie industry in California.

    The 1934 Mae West film, “the Belle of the Nineties”, was loosely based on Lulu’s exploits.

    Tobacco flower, white gardenia, bergamot, and bourbon geranium.

    Out of Stock