Genius Loci

Consult the genius of place in all.

The spirits of the land, the spirits of place. They are the protectors of nature and those who operate within their boundaries. In order to connect to these spirits, you have to examine and understand the native wildlife and flora, the weather patterns and topography, this history of the people that inhabited the land and the cosmology of the gods that smiled upon and smote its people. It is the essence of all that has lived and died there, it is the breath of the wind, the warmth of the soil, the bright burst of blood and the cool touch of thousands of years of morning dew, the echoes of a millennia of laughter, howls, screams, and scuttlings. It is the song of the land itself manifested into one energy, one soul; to propitiate it is to bring power and good fortune, but to anger or neglect spells ruin.

This is our multi-faceted series dedicated to the genii of Los Angeles, and we begin with the fluttering wings of LA’s psyche: butterflies.

Image: Los Angeles, 1906.

The Trading Post is slingin’ some Genius Loci hair glosses.

  • Genius Loci: Bats of Los Angeles

    Genius Loci: Bats of Los Angeles

  • Allen’s Big Eared Bat Perfume Oil

    These mountain-dwelling cutie pies roost in caves, mines, and rocky outcrops, and love to munch on moths that they catch mid-flight.

    A fuzzy moth scent, dappled grey and delicious: rosehips and sandalwood with a touch of tobacco flower.

    Out of Stock
  • Anise Swallowtail Perfume Oil

    The Anise Swallowtail is a creature of wide open spaces. She flies through wide open spaces, over hills and through lots abandoned by humankind, dancing among dill, parsley, fennel, and wild carrots.

    Bourbon vanilla, star anise, cypress, juniper berry, a drop of blood orange, and bronze fennel.

    Out of Stock
  • Cabbage White Perfume Oil

    A tiny creature with a wingspan less than two inches wide, she thrives on diversity but has a taste for mustard. She may be small, but she is fierce: one cabbage white butterfly can be the matriarch of generations of millions.

    Orris root, orris butter, lily of the valley, and vanilla cream.

    Out of Stock
  • California Leaf-Nosed Bat Perfume Oil

    The California Leaf-Nosed Bat prefers the desert. They’re homebodies and do not migrate, and they’re also definitely Type A bats, as they don’t hibernate. Go go go!

    Nightfall in the desert: Mojave yucca, creosote bush, saguaro, dusty clove, and sacred datura.

    Out of Stock
  • Dainty Sulphur Perfume Oil

    Drifting low to the ground, this tiny, tough butterfly searches for nectar and mates in vacant lots and coastal flats.

    Orange blossom and brimstone.

    Out of Stock
  • Echo Azure Perfume Oil

    Our gilded silvery mud-puddler! His scent is of the blackberry bushes and wild lilacs in which he makes his home.

    Out of Stock
  • El Segundo Blue Perfume Oil

    The El Segundo Blue butterfly is endangered, and only three colonies remain: one at Los Angeles International Airport, one at an oil refinery, and one on a tiny patch of SoCal beach.

    Sand and sea salt, murky beach water, a gust of peony, and a drop of petroleum.

    Out of Stock
  • Ghost Faced Bat Perfume Oil

    A venerable and well-respected bat, Ghost Face Bats can trace their ancestry to the late Pleistocene era.

    Sugared coconut meat, vanilla pods, condensed milk, white honey, and benzoin.

    Out of Stock
  • Great Basin Woodnymph Perfume Oil

    A child of summer, the woodnymph sips moisture from the sand and flits through grasses and wild buckwheat.

    Hay and grasses with two eyespots of cacao and tonka.

    Out of Stock
  • Mexican Long-Tongued Bat Perfume Oil

    The Gene Simmons of the Phyllostomidae family, this little buddy has a tongue built for harvesting nectar, extending up to a third of its body length and covered in hairy and horny papillae.

    Smoked chili peppers, caramelized saffron, and clove bud.

    Out of Stock
  • Pallid Bat Perfume Oil

    I want my rooftop filled with Pallid Bats. Not only are they cute as hell, but their favored meal is the Arizona bark scorpion, whose sting is the most venomous to be found in North America.

    Bats > Scorpions
    (Sorry, Scorpios!)

    Tea leaf, bourbon, a sting of white ginger, and Italian bergamot swirled in amber incense smoke.

    Out of Stock
  • Queen Butterfly Perfume Oil

    Lady Butterfly
    perfumes her wings
    by floating over this orchid

    Russet amber and orange blossom honey, red labdanum and wild plum, golden musk and a rustle of patchouli root.

    Out of Stock