Limited Edition

LIMITED EDITION BLENDS
No imp’s ears are available for Limited Edition scents.
Presented in an amber apothecary glass vial.

Note: only 5ml bottles are offered in our limited edition scents. Please check the BPAL forum for stock updates. No samples can be requested for any limited edition scents, as they are not taken into consideration or assimilated into stock when the limited edition oils are made. Simply put: there are none to give. If you request a sample of a limited edition scent, we will swap for a random “permanent” scent.

  • Earth Dog

    A new year's blessing! Peony, China's national flower, with bamboo for flexibility, plum blossom for perseverance, courage, and hope, tangerine for wealth, red sandalwood and blue lotus for purity, orange for happiness, lychee for household peace, pine resin for constancy, golden kumquat for prosperity, red mandarin for good fortune, peach blossom for longevity, a touch of patchouli to bring it all down to earth, with a splash of blazing red of dragon's blood… to help you scare away the rampaging Nian.

    Out of Stock
  • King Cake

    A sweet brioche cake with a hint of almond, glazed with cream cheese frosting and gleaming with purple, green, and gold sugar.

    Some bottles will be shipped – randomly – with a tiny king cake trinket.

    Illustration: Krewe of Comus, 1869.

    Out of Stock

Limited Edition - Resurrected

These long-dead scents are back for a limited time in a slightly tweaked form!

Due to component issues, the originals are gone for good, but their spirits are back to haunt us until August 29th.

  • Aeval – Resurrected

    A raven-haired Fairy Queen of Ireland.

    One of her eternal duties dictates that she must hold a midnight court every season and hear the pleas of married Irishwomen. The court serves only to determine whether or not husbands are adequately serving their wife's sexual needs. A judicious yet powerfully sensual blend, a mingling of justice and sexuality: sage, sweet pea, bold pale musk and warm tonka.

    Select Options
  • Baghdad – Resurrected

    Amber, saffron and bergamot with mandarin, nutmeg, Bulgar rose, musk and sandalwood.

    Select Options
  • Black Hellebore – Resurrected

    Also called Melampode. In witchcraft legend, this is one of the components of the notorious flying ointment, and is used in rituals that summon the Devil. In Greek mythology, Melampus of Pylos used hellebore to save the daughters of the king of Argos from a Dionysian Maenad-like madness. In Christian myth, hellebore was born from the tears a little girl shed onto the snow because she had no gift to give to the Christ child. In low magick, it has been used by farmers to protect their livestock from the evil eye. Court magicians have used it in martial invisibility spells, enabling spies and assassins to infiltrate enemy camps. Hellebore resembles the wild rose, but does not belong to their family. The scent is a pale green herbal, darkly rooty, with a faint rose and peony-like overtone.

    Borage and hellebore fill two scenes,
    Sovereign plants to purge the veins
    Of melancholy, and cheer the heart
    Of those black fumes which make it smart.

    Select Options
  • Bluebeard – Resurrected

    A scent swirling with dark rage, unbridled jealousy, and murderous intent. Violet, lavender, white musk and vetiver.

    Select Options
  • Bread-and-Butterfly – Resurrected

    `Crawling at your feet,' said the Gnat (Alice drew her feet back in some alarm), `you may observe a Bread-and-Butterfly. Its wings are thin slices of Bread-and-butter, its body is a crust, and its head is a lump of sugar.'

    `And what does IT live on?'

    `Weak tea with cream in it.'

    Bread, lightly buttered, with weak tea, cream, and a lump of white sugar.

    Select Options
  • De Sade – Resurrected

    The essence of pleasure heightened by pain: the raw scent of leather.

    Select Options
  • Dragon’s Eye – Resurrected

    A piercing, radiant perfume: dragon's blood resin, lily of the valley, lilac and galbanum.

    Select Options
  • Forbidden Fruit – Resurrected

    As light and innocent as your first time should have been. The fresh scent of lotus hidden behind lightly scented flowers, amber, and citrus.

    Select Options
  • Loviatar – Resurrected

    The Finnish Goddess of Agony, Torment and the joy found in inflicting pain on others. The Mistress of Torture, she has transformed in the modern era into the patron Goddess of Dominatrixes. The slap of slick, hot leather punctuates the warm, sensual embrace of black amber, red musk and dark, lascivious myrrh.

    Select Options
  • Silk Road – Resurrected

    A panoply of cultural treasures, spanning the herbs, flowers, oils and balms of the Romans, the Byzantines, the Mediterranean, the Levant, Northern China, Eastern Europe, Iran, the Bulgar-Kypchak, Mesopotamia, the Crimean Peninsula, Anatolia, Antioch, and North Africa.

    Select Options
  • Ultraviolet – Resurrected

    Electrifying, mechanized and chilly — the scent of crushed blooms strewn on cold metal. Lush violet and neroli spiked hard with eucalyptus and a sliver of mint.

    Select Options
  • Umbra – Resurrected

    The deepest, darkest point in a shadow; the area contained within the shadow of an eclipse. East African black patchouli, cedarwood, vetiver and a dribble of cinnamon.

    Select Options
  • Venom – Resurrected

    Darkly seductive and lethally compelling: sinuous oponax, galbanum, dark wild berries, a drop of lush jasmine and a sliver of lime.

    Select Options

Limited Edition - The Fool’s Journey - Aspects of the Fool

The Excuse, the Madman, the Wild Card, the Highest Trump That Prospers from All Previous Tricks. He is the Everyman, but also the Outsider and the narrator in the moment that he enters the tale. The Fool is the root from which all the other trumps spring, but is also the card without value. He carries no number because he stands outside, above, and below the social order; he exists beyond the other cards, unencumbered. He is free to move both onstage and backstage; he can break the fourth wall and address the audience. He is improvisation, the unwritten script. Folly and sagacity, hesitation and leaps of faith. Absolute freedom, absolute nothingness; anarchy, indifference, prodigality, balance, and imbalance.

Everything matters, nothing matters. We all walk off the cliff eventually.

  • Eyes Skyward, Eyes Shut

    Divine ecstasy and divine madness. Ambivalence and absolute faith.

    Frankincense and lemon peel drifting on a cloud of lemongrass, white coconut, sandalwood, and vanilla absolute.

    Out of Stock
  • The Bindle

    A jester’s balloon, a vagabond’s pack. The riddle and the punch line. The Consequence, the Mystery, the Untapped Collective Knowledge of All Mankind.

    Jasmine petals tumbled with a panoply of spices, suffused with incense smoke.

    Out of Stock
  • The Fool’s Dog

    Sometimes playfully walking with the Fool, sometimes tugging on his stockings, sometimes attacking in a pack, sometimes tearing the ass out of his pants, sometimes chomping him right on the nuts: feral and tame, guardian and hunter, loyalty and opposition. Sometimes guiding the Fool off the cliff and other times warning him of dangers ahead.

    A warm canine musk, trampled grass, a gleam of ivory-white fang, cardamom pod, and crushed yew.

    Out of Stock
  • The Fool’s Rose

    Purity of ideal, unsullied innocence, liberation from base desires and worldly trappings.

    White rose, frankincense, verbena, and angelica root.

    Out of Stock
  • The Fool’s Tranquility

    At peace with recklessness and abandon, the serenity of accepting the embrace of disorder and obliquity: pink pepper and honey.

    Out of Stock
  • The Precipice

    The Leap of Faith or the Apex of Irresponsibility. One foot remains precariously touching the earth, the other hovers towards enlightenment or oblivion.

    Green tea, neroli, and osmanthus, patchouli root, Spanish moss, tobacco absolute, and vetiver.

    Out of Stock

Limited Edition - The Fool’s Journey - Faces of the Fool

  • Fate’s Jester

    Speaking truth to kings, beggars, and popes alike, immune to retribution and lordly wrath as he flings wise quips like cream pies and barbed arrows.

    A motley tunic, festooned in bells: red currant and lemon peel over sugared patchouli and a bit of buttercream.

    Out of Stock
  • Il Matto

    Reviled and mocked, pelted by stones and set upon by dogs, all the while singing the song of divine madness: red sandalwood, tobacco absolute, palo santo, black copal and balsam dusted by burnt sage, soot, and an echo of frankincense.

    Out of Stock
  • Jongleur

    Wherein the Magician and the Fool are one, spinning the story and juggling the knives that drive a man’s fate.

    Frankincense and star anise, bergamot and clove bud, rue and green cinnamon, saffron and carnation, cedar and vanilla absolute.

    Out of Stock
  • Narr

    The affable fool who uses his own obtuseness and ignorance to his advantage: milk, honey, and wild fig with ambrette seed and almond buttercream.

    Out of Stock
  • The Scapegoat

    To save a trump card, sometimes you must make sacrifices: tolu balsam, leather, labdanum, black pepper, and benzoin.

    Out of Stock
  • The Stranger

    The unknown factor, the outsider entering your town uninvited, unannounced, and unknown: a narcotic black chypre with crushed violets, indigo lilac, patchouli, oakmoss absolute, labdanum, and clove.

    Out of Stock

Limited Edition - The Fool’s Journey - The Magician - Aspects of the Magician

The First Trump, the Master of Ceremonies, the Compère, the Doorkeeper of the Tarot. Originally the Juggler – the prototypical Trickster – he was transformed by the shifting currents of collective consciousness into the consummate Magus. He is the Carnival King and the Lord of Gamblers, the First Diviner and the Master of Chance. He is Hermes, he is Mercury, he is Apollo; he is the opening note and the final triumph of the Opus and the Messenger of the Divine. He commands, controls, and synthesizes the Four Elements; he is Aleph, he is the first substance, he is the source of all numbers. He is the intersection of Heaven and Earth.

The Magician in his current incarnation embodies action in all forms, skill and perspicacity, the utilization of innate talents, and deliberate, conscious transformation, yet he is still the Juggler – the Supreme Trickster – forever playing Three-card Monte with your fate.

  • The Lemniscate

    The sign of life, the sigil of eternity. The mathematics that form the structure of the universe, the finality of Omega, yet also the inconceivable, endless space beyond. Immortality and rebirth, the perfect aspiration of Spirit.

    Frankincense and black pepper, Himalayan cedar, cognac, and tobacco.

    Add to cart
  • The Magician’s Belt

    The Ouroboros, the serpent as he consumes his own tail. Within this everlasting cycle, the spirit is reborn into eternity: frankincense, white rose, balsam, almond flower, and benzoin.

    Add to cart
  • The Magician’s Garden

    Flos campi and lilium convallium, Rose of Sharon and Lily of the Valley: the blossoms of transcendence and spiritual aspiration.

    Add to cart
  • The Magician’s Hands

    The Magician’s right hand bears the wand of Will aloft, while his left hand points earthward. This is the descent of grace, the act of drawing Divine light and inspiration to the material, mortal realm.

    Sweet myrrh, calamus, ambrette seed, and Ceylon cinnamon.

    Add to cart
  • The Magician’s Robes

    The Red King and White Queen, sulfur and mercury, Rubedo and Albedo. The unification of opposites, putrefaction and individuation, the culmination of the Great Work.

    ὁδὸς ἄνω κάτω μία καὶ ὡυτή: red and white musks alight with frankincense, white oudh, sweet labdanum, and saffron. The way up and the way down are one and the same.

    Add to cart
  • The Magician’s Tools

    With the Wand createth He.
    With the Cup preserveth He.
    With the Dagger destroyeth He.
    With the Coin redeemeth He.
    – Liber B vel Magi sub Figura I

    Clary sage and patchouli for Earth, lavender and yarrow for Air, tobacco and Dracaena cinnabari for Fire, lotus root and myrrh for Water.

    Add to cart
  • The Magician’s Wand

    Energy, will, and the manifested Word of the Magus. It is the generative process, the act of creation: ash, rowan, oak, and elder wood, polished with sweet resins but handworn, glowing with inner fire.

    Add to cart

Limited Edition - The Fool’s Journey - The Magician - Faces of the Magician

  • Il Bagatella

    The Carnival King, the embodiment of the liminal space that exists between the death and resurrection of Christ: pomegranate and Lebanese cedar, the martyr’s red rose, and an aspergillum of wine-soaked hyssop.

    Add to cart
  • Taschenspieler

    The master of sleight-of-hand and trickery: dexterous, clever, and roguish. He is the mischief-maker whose tricks propel men to action, or dupe the foolish into traps of their own creation.

    Peru balsam, tobacco absolute, leather, white sage, and blackberry juice.

    Add to cart
  • The Harlequin

    The Divine Comedian, the Eternal Jester, instructing through pranks and buffoonery:  vetiver-steeped raspberry and red currant.

    Add to cart
  • The Legerdemain

    The twilight in between the stage performer and the Magus; the sleight of hand trick transforms into true sorcerous skill: black silken musk, dark clove, guiac wood, black pepper, frankincense, and cardamom.

    Add to cart
  • The Magus

    The Sorcerer, the Cunning-Man, the Sage. He is the Kerux, Initiator and Psychopomp, the Divine Messenger who leads neophytes on their paths through the Mysteries and shepherds the souls to the underworld.

    Honey absolute, Oman frankincense, and asphodel.

    Add to cart
  • The Mountebank

    The Hustler, the Scoundrel, the Grifter, using the magic of misdirection, charm, and subtlety to swindle his way through this world, and through all worlds, seen and unseen. Eloquent and glib, he is the quintessential knave. He is the Guardian of Gamblers and the Protector of Con-Men.

    A confidence trick: leather, sweet balsam, white sandalwood, thieves’ rosin, and dusty lavender.

    Add to cart
  • The Storyteller

    The Raconteur, the Town Gossip, and the first character to appear on the stage in the first act. He is the Minstrel of the Heavens, the Devil’s Messenger, spinning morality tales, singing songs of loss, laughter, and triumph, and murmuring prophecies to all.

    Beeswax, leather, hearth wood, and campfire smoke.

    Add to cart

Limited Edition - The Fool’s Journey - The High Priestess - Aspects of the High Priestess

The first of the four Temporal Rulers of the Major Arcana, who move and act within our world and our reality. Her hands, along with the Hierophant’s, the Empress’s, and the Emperor’s, turn the wheel of time. The Star Maiden, She Who Shines in the Darkness, High Priestess of Veiled Golden Isis, the Eternal Virgin. She is the Unutterable Truth, the Portal to the Mystery, the catalyst of the alchemical process of dissolution. This is Shekhinah, the presence and dwelling place of the feminine aspect of the Divine, the feminine manifestation of the presence of God, residing in the Temple in Jerusalem, the Tabernacle, and wherever [AB1] people are gathered together in prayer. She is the transformational spirit of God and the birthplace of prophecy. She is the Sabbath Bride, she is Sister Manfreda, she is Pope Joan, she is Veiled Isis, she is the Virgin Huntress, she is the female incarnation of Metatron.

Originally, the High Priestess was the Papesse, who was perceived as an allegory for the power of the Church, a heretical scapegoat, an incarnation of the Holy Spirit, or the herald of a new age. Later, she transformed into the virgin priestess, eternally pure, forever guarding the doorway to the mysteries.

Standing beside the Magician, together they represent binary principles of the universe: light and dark, action and stillness, exoteric and esoteric, knowledge and intuition. Where the Magician moves externally, controlling the forces of nature, the High Priestess turns inward, granting understanding of the mysteries of creation and the miracle of existence itself. She is the Moon, and the Hierophant is the Sun. She is the conduit between the archetypical and formative worlds, and she is the only guide capable of traversing the terrible wasteland that is the bleak desert of the soul[AB2] . She is intuition and the inner voice, opening your eyes to the potency and power of your dreams, your subconscious, and your imagination, granting insight into the myriad realities beyond the scope of your current understanding.

Is finding answers more important than finding peace? What price are you willing to pay for a chance to look behind the veil?

  • Pomegranates and Date Palms

    The Mysteries of Persephone’s divine descent entwined with the Mysteries of the Temple of Solomon, forming a map of the Tree of Life.

    He made chains in the inner sanctuary and placed them on the tops of the pillars; and he made one hundred pomegranates and placed them on the chains.

     

    Pomegranate, dates, and cypress infused with ketoret smoke veiled in violet, purple, and crimson.

    Add to cart
  • The Crescent Moon

    The mystery of divine virginity, insemination, and the cradle of all birth. Fertility, wise counsel, and the gift of true wisdom.

     

    Gleaming amber and copal with white sage and sheer juniper.

    Add to cart
  • The Cross

    The integration of spirit with the material world: frankincense, styrax, oakmoss, patchouli, and birch tar.

    Add to cart
  • The Crown

    The three phases of the moon fashioned into a lunar triregnum: blue chamomile, mugwort, and orris root.

    Add to cart
  • The Pillars

    The pillars at the entrance to Solomon’s temple. And he reared up the pillars before the temple, one on the right hand, and the other on the left; and called the name of that on the right hand Jachin, and the name of that on the left Boaz.

     

    “These two pillars, therefore, stand for the two great spiritual principles that are the basis of all Life: Jachin typifying the Unity resulting from Being, and Boaz typifying the Unity resulting from Love. In this Dual-Unity we find the key to all conceivable involution or evolution of Spirit; and it is therefore not without reason that the record of these two ancient pillars has been preserved in our Scriptures. And finally we may take this as an index to the character of our Scriptures generally. They contain infinite meanings; and often those passages which appear on the surface to be most meaningless will be found to possess the deepest significance. The Book, which we often read so superficially, hides beneath its sometimes seemingly trivial words the secrets of other things. The twin pillars Jachin and Boaz bear witness to this truth.”

    – The Hidden Power by Thomas Troward, 1921

     

    White cedar, cypress wood, sweet myrrh, honey myrtle, white sandalwood, spikenard, and frankincense.

    Add to cart
  • The Scroll

    Her scroll is sealed, her book is closed, and she is silent: the wisdom that she grants is that which cannot be put into words, that which cannot be recorded but must be experienced.

     

    Honeyed myrrh with a drop of Ceylon cinnamon.

    Add to cart

Limited Edition - The Fool’s Journey - The High Priestess - Faces of the High Priestess

  • La Papesse

    A visionary heretic, martyred to usher in a new Aeon: rose oudh, blackened myrrh, and cathedral incense.

    Add to cart
  • The Eternal Virgin

    The keeper of the secrets that are hidden [AB3] at the moment that life begins. Her light is the veil that cloaks the spirit; she is the mediator between the supplicant and the word of the gods.

     

    White carnation, cardamom pod, and honey milk.

    Add to cart
  • The Initiatrix

    Guiding the aspirant to spiritual knowledge and attainment through silence, reflection, intuition, and direct experience.

     

    Red benzoin and rose.

    Add to cart
  • The Moon Goddess

    Virgin, huntress, witch, holding the mysteries and powers of womanhood between her palms: vetiver, white pine,  hay, Sicilian lemon, leather, and agarwood.

    Add to cart
  • The Night Priestess

    Who leads the star-dazed hero in a moon-blessed quest for his mythical lover: night-blooming jasmine, clove bud, cardamom, moonlit vanilla orchid, and moonflower.

    Add to cart

Limited Edition - 7 Word Story

  • Seven Word Story: Envy

    The subject of our latest #BPAL7wordstory contest was Envy. The winning entry was submitted by Tyler Butler:

    Galatea wept as Pygmalion carved new statues

    Marble-white sandalwood, vanilla blossom, and orris root veined with whorls of ambergris accord, rose-touched with life, slowly shattering tears of bitter carrot seed and cistus.

    Add to cart
  • Seven Word Story: Gluttony

    The subject of our latest #BPAL7wordstory contest was Gluttony. The winning entry was submitted by Crystal Rose-Thompson:

    The Sirens Eagerly Beckoned the Approaching Ship

    Sea splash on murky labdanum and gleaming olibanum, veiled in lavender, diaphanous osmanthus, gilded saffron, and honey incense.

    Add to cart
  • Seven Word Story: Lust

    Quoth one of the wordiest humans who ever lived: “Brevity is the soul of wit.” 

    This spring we challenged friends and fans to answer that call, baring their souls (and more) in our steamy, Lust-themed #BPAL7wordstory contest.

    “Seduce us in seven!” we demanded, promising the winning story would be enshrined in a Limited Edition fragrance. The response was overwhelming — and downright filthy. Over eight hundred entries later, Lust found its new champion. The winning story, submitted via Twitter by @GeekDame, took flight in our perfumer’s imagination and resulted in the following myth-tinged tryst. 

    Congrats to the winner, and keep your quills sharp! #BPAL7wordstory is only getting started. 

    He breathed smoke across her pomegranate-stained lips.

     Chthonic incense and blood-red pomegranate.

    Add to cart
  • Seven Word Story: Pride

    The subject of our latest #BPAL7wordstory contest was Pride. The winning entry was submitted by Cam Collins:

    The alligator selfie was a bad idea.

    A swampy blend of Spanish moss, green tea, green oakmoss, celery seed, cucumber, and murky black patchouli.

    Add to cart
  • Seven Word Story: Sloth

    As Baudelaire once wrote, “We revel in the laxness of the path we take.” As such, we weren’t convinced anyone would bother entering the Sloth edition of our #BPAL7wordstory contest.

    Somehow, hundreds of you summoned the strength to string seven words together — plus the dozens who cheekily declined to muster more than six. The winning entry by Amy DeNies epitomizes that (lack of) effort with aplomb.

    Congrats to our winner, and keep those heavy eyelids propped open — #BPAL7wordstory could strike again at any time.

    can’t commit to finishing a whole banana

    The effort is too much: banana weighed down by blackened cacao, bourbon vetiver, and tobacco absolute.

    Add to cart
  • Seven Word Story: Wrath

    The subject of our latest #BPAL7wordstory contest was WRATH. The winning entry was submitted by Miss Paulette:

    The poison worked slowly, to her delight.

    Bitter almond swirled into black patchouli, with red amber, rum absolute, and lemon peel.

    Add to cart

Limited Edition - Aros Morbus: Mors Nigra

O happy posterity, who will not experience such abysmal woe and will look upon our testimony as a fable.

On the 20th of Mach, 1345, it is believed that a triple conjunction of Saturn, Jupiter and Mars in Aquarius harbingered one of the most catastrophic pandemics in all of human history, resulting in the deaths of between 75 and 200 million people in Eurasia, and initiating a death culture that would last well into our time.

Austin Coppock – one of the most talented, eloquent astrologers of our age – shares his insight:

It is a contemporary conceit to believe that plague is no longer with us. The post WWII years saw the humans triumph over a host of age-old afflictions. Polio, whooping cough tuberculosis and more fell one-by-one to the scalpel of modern science. Yet these gains, taken for granted, grow smaller every year. Long slumbering diseases have been roused, and those which were scheduled for elimination have shown dogged resistance to humanity’s best efforts. Plague is thus not a thing of the past, but an everpresent horseman, keeping pace with human progress. Though we may have pulled into a small lead, we have by no means outrun this dark rider.

12421778_10154071916988293_41845864_nThose who came before us knew well that this rider was forever at their back, and thus lived in anticipation of his terrible arrival. It should thus be in no way shocking to find that astrologers throughout history have done their very best to predict the times at which the waves of pestilence would crash against our shore. In a report commissioned by King Phillip VI from the University of Paris’ Medical Faculty in 1348, the fault of the great plague was thought to lie in a rare conjunction of Saturn, Jupiter and Mars in Aquarius which had occurred some years earlier, in 1345. The report pointed to the malefic nature of the Great Conjunction which had occurred those few years earlier, and how it augured a disease both swift and terrible. But Medical Faculty of the University of Paris had the benefit of hindsight, and their retrospective spared no one.

Several hundred years later, in 17th century England, lived an astrologer somewhat more prescient. William Lilly, the “English Merlin” wrote in his 1665 Almanac “Here is approaching great fatality unto mankind…there may be feared some dangerous mortality, or plague to be at hand, inflicting destruction.” Furthermore, he wrote of “a sickly summer…during June, July or August..” Accompanied by the macabre illustration seen below, Mr. Lilly’s prediction was more than satisfied, for a plague swept the city of London at the appointed time, claiming one in six of its inhabitants.

Though rarely regarded with much reverence, the configuration of the heavens still proclaims the coming of afflictions terrible and cruel. When in August of 2014, Mars the Lesser Malefic and Saturn the Greater Malefic made their conjunction in the tropical sign of the Scorpio, a plague of sanguine horror spread about the lands of western Africa— Ebola.

Yet the planets did not speak of these terrible genesis, but instead their climax. Perhaps it is not the dire conjunctions which bring about such sicknesses, but instead merely direct our awareness to them. The sinister red light of Mars and the dull grave dirt glow of Saturn may indeed only seem evil to us in that they serve to illuminate the work of the horseman forever at our side.

One must wonder, then, what the heavens of this year are trying to communicate, for Mars and Saturn spend an unusual amount of together in 2016. They flirt for all of April, and then separate, only to be joined bodily over the Summer. They will do so against the red backdrop of Antares- the Heart of the Scorpio. Three eyed, like the oni of Japanese folkore, one can only wonder what this trio of eyes sees in our spring and summer months.

The Plagues will be expanded with a study of the art and cultural impact of the Black Death this spring.

  • Conjunction of Mars and Saturn

    Daemonorops, star thistle, wild tobacco, and asafoetida intensified by hemlock accord, black musk seed, mortuary cypress, and black gum leaf.

    [Label illustration: Adolf Vogel]

    Add to cart
  • In Time of Plague

    Adieu, farewell earth’s bliss!
    This world uncertain is:
    Fond are life’s lustful joys,
    Death proves them all but toys.
    None from his darts can fly;
    I am sick, I must die—
    Lord, have mercy on us!

    Rich men, trust not in wealth,
    Gold cannot buy you health;
    Physic himself must fade;
    All things to end are made;
    The plague full swift goes by;
    I am sick, I must die—
    Lord, have mercy on us!

    Beauty is but a flower
    Which wrinkles will devour;
    Brightness falls from the air;
    Queens have died young and fair;
    Dust hath closed Helen’s eye;
    I am sick, I must die—
    Lord, have mercy on us!

    Strength stoops unto the grave,
    Worms feed on Hector brave;
    Swords may not fight with fate;
    Earth still holds ope her gate;
    Come, come! the bells do cry;
    I am sick, I must die—
    Lord, have mercy on us!

    Wit with his wantonness
    Tasteth death’s bitterness;
    Hell’s executioner
    Hath no ears for to hear
    What vain art can reply:
    I am sick, I must die—
    Lord, have mercy on us!

    Haste therefore each degree
    To welcome destiny;
    Heaven is our heritage,
    Earth but a player’s stage.
    Mount we unto the sky;
    I am sick, I must die—
    Lord, have mercy on us!
    – Thomas Nashe

    Blackened roses against a backdrop of velvet opoponax, bitter clove, and tobacco abosolute.

    Add to cart