Peony

  • Amsterdam

    Tulips, peony, fresh flowing water and crisp green grasses.

    Select Options
  • Black Hellebore – Resurrected

    Also called Melampode. In witchcraft legend, this is one of the components of the notorious flying ointment, and is used in rituals that summon the Devil. In Greek mythology, Melampus of Pylos used hellebore to save the daughters of the king of Argos from a Dionysian Maenad-like madness. In Christian myth, hellebore was born from the tears a little girl shed onto the snow because she had no gift to give to the Christ child. In low magick, it has been used by farmers to protect their livestock from the evil eye. Court magicians have used it in martial invisibility spells, enabling spies and assassins to infiltrate enemy camps. Hellebore resembles the wild rose, but does not belong to their family. The scent is a pale green herbal, darkly rooty, with a faint rose and peony-like overtone.

    Borage and hellebore fill two scenes,
    Sovereign plants to purge the veins
    Of melancholy, and cheer the heart
    Of those black fumes which make it smart.

    Out of Stock
  • Dormouse

    A dizzying eddy of four teas brushed with light herbs and a breath of peony.

    Select Options
  • Earth Dog

    A new year's blessing! Peony, China's national flower, with bamboo for flexibility, plum blossom for perseverance, courage, and hope, tangerine for wealth, red sandalwood and blue lotus for purity, orange for happiness, lychee for household peace, pine resin for constancy, golden kumquat for prosperity, red mandarin for good fortune, peach blossom for longevity, a touch of patchouli to bring it all down to earth, with a splash of blazing red of dragon's blood… to help you scare away the rampaging Nian.

    Out of Stock
  • El Segundo Blue

    The El Segundo Blue butterfly is endangered, and only three colonies remain: one at Los Angeles International Airport, one at an oil refinery, and one on a tiny patch of SoCal beach.

    Sand and sea salt, murky beach water, a gust of peony, and a drop of petroleum.

    Add to cart
  • Fortuna Primigenia

    The Fortunes that Govern Childbearing, the Fortunes of a Child at the Moment of Their Birth

    A hymn for blessing new mothers and newborn babies: white ambrette seed, motherwort, peony, jasmine tea, green tea leaf, Italian bergamot, and white cedar.

    (If you are pregnant or nursing, please do not use this oil, and please do not use this oil on infants or toddlers. It is best used in a scent locket, or to adorn clothing or amulets.)

    Out of Stock
  • Let Your Indulgence Set Me Free

    There are several scents this year that are inspired by Lilith’s performance in the Tempest, and this one was born from the triumphant smile on her face as she held the flowers her family brought for her.

    A cluster of peonies, carnations, roses, lilies and sweet pea cascading over a bright vanilla smile.

    Add to cart
  • Lilith Nightingale

    Whenever I’m sick, tired, or just run down, Lilith always tries to help out. She’s always helpful, but when someone is feeling poorly, she’s an absolute angel.

    This year, now that she’s a little bit older, she’s taken to cooking a bit here and there. Here, she’s stealing my Evil Dead shirt and making kitchari for me. I was feeling under the weather, and she wanted to take care of me. Oh my GOD, I love this kid.

    (She’s taken to wearing protective goggles that Brian gave her every time she cooks.)

    A bundle of Ayurvedic spices warmed in cream, with a little bit of dried fig and sweet dates.

    Add to cart