Oakmoss

  • A Rebus

    Star jasmine, oppoponax, sweet oudh, tuberose absolute, ambrette seed, and oakmoss.

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  • Alcie

    Sassy. Impetuous. Loyal. Alcestis Artemisia Medusa, with her red hair and brown-green eyes, is prettier than most and is having a much easier time with all the “maiden stuff.” Alcie’s father, a wealthy man, buys all the latest toga clasps, hair irons and ankle bracelets for his daughter, so she’s always rather lovely. However, Alcie is also a distant niece of the great Gorgon Medusa, a creature so hideous that anyone who looked into its eyes would immediately turn to stone. A young hero, Perseus, had cut off Medusa’s head some years earlier, so at least all the relatives didn’t have to worry about Medusa showing up for feast days, but Alcie was still embarrassed by the blot on the family name.

    Just a hint of gorgon blood: bright nectarine, honey, sandalwood, green musk, sea buckthorn berry, and oakmoss.

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  • Beauty, The Aggrieved

    A white rose draped by a delicate, pale, sheer veil of vanilla, the depth and darkness of her black lace embodied by tobacco absolute, Indonesian patchouli, Bulgarian oakmoss, frankincense, white sandalwood, and myrrh.

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  • But Men Loved Darkness Rather Than Light

    The world’s light shines, shine as it will,
    The world will love its darkness still.
    I doubt though when the world’s in hell,
    It will not love its darkness half so well.

    The world will love its darkness: cistus labdanum, ginger, East Indian patchouli, pimento berry, oakmoss, saffron, smoky vanilla, sage, myrrh, and bitter clove.

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  • Crowley

    Nothing about him looked particularly demonic, at least by classical standards. No horns, no wings. Admittedly he was listening to a Best of Queen tape, but no conclusions should be drawn from this because all tapes left in a car for more than a fortnights metamorphose into Best of Queen albums. No particularly demonic thoughts were going through his head. In fact, he was wondering vaguely who Moey and Chandon were.

    Crowley had dark hair, and good cheekbones, and he was wearing snakeskin shoes, or at least presumably he was wearing shoes, and he could do really weird things with his tongue. And, whenever he forgot himself, he had a tendency to hiss.

    Infernal musk, red patchouli, lilac cologne, mahogany, lemon rind, oakmoss, leather, and vanilla husk.

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  • Eighth Lash

    Matted fur, oakmoss, and clove.

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  • Fae

    A brilliant, ethereal scent: white musk, bergamot, heliotrope, peach and oakmoss.

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  • Faiza, The Lady of Serpents

    Upon the next stage, a primitive cage has been erected. It is made of heavy, dark sticks bound with strips of deep brown leather. The stage is as dark as pitch, and from the shadows, you hear soft hissing, spitting, and an ominous chorus of weird rattling sounds. You approach with some trepidation, and peer between the bars. Your attention is seized by writhing forms on the straw bottom of the cage. As your eyes adjust to the gloom, you realize that the floor is seething with serpents, dark and colorful, languid and large, swift and small. You hear a sultry chuckle, and you see bright, unblinking emerald eyes staring at you from the corner of the cage. A woman crawls through the snakes, her scaled body as sinuous and lissome as the creatures that share her home. She reaches towards you languorously with her sharp-clawed hands and sighs.

    A sensual blend of twisting, exotic, serpentine oils: black amber, oakmoss, green sandalwood, bergamot, jasmine sambac, gardenia, orange pulp, black cardamom, vanilla, blackberry, black musk, blackened vanilla husk, white honey, ti leaf, and ginger.

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  • Greed

    Base and earthy, yet glittering with golden notes: patchouli, heliotrope, copal and oakmoss.

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  • Horreur Sympathique

    From livid skies that, without end,
    As stormy as your future roll,
    What thoughts into your empty soul
    (Answer me, libertine!) descend?

    – Insatiable yet for all
    That turns on darkness, doom, or dice,
    I’ll not, like Ovid, mourn my fall,
    Chased from the Latin paradise.

    Skies, torn like seacoasts by the storm!
    In you I see my pride take form,
    And the huge clouds that rush in streams

    Are the black hearses of my dreams,
    And your red rays reflect the hell,
    In which my heart is pleased to dwell.

    The perfume of a hellbound soul, gleefully lost to iniquity: blood musk, golden honey, thick black wine, champagne grapes, tobacco flower, plum blossom, tonka bean, oakmoss, carnation, benzoin, opoponax, and sugar cane.

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  • Kinoko

    Mushroom musk, oakmoss, and rooibos leaf.

    Out of Stock
  • Lajos

    A tribute to Lajos Pap, a spiritualist medium whose specialty was apporting snakes, lizards, rats, and frogs – live and dead – during séance.

    A pattering of night-creatures: indigo musk and patchouli croaking with oakmoss and a skittering of gleaming black olibanum.

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  • Lily, The Prostitute

    Heady blossoms of jasmine, white gardenia, and magnolia sharpened by neroli, given a voluptuous depth by red patchouli, oakmoss, and cedar.

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  • Lovers at the Entrance to a House of Pleasure Spied on by a Kamuro Through the Hanging Curtain

    White gardenia, oakmoss, champaca blossom, magnolia leaf, vanilla orchid, and tobacco absolute.

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  • Monk and Actor

    Soft auburn musk, clove bud, honeyed patchouli, oakmoss absolute, cashmere labdanum, cedar, and mimosa blossom.

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  • Nephilim

    Dark children conceived from the union of Fallen Angels and the Daughters of Men. According to lore, the angel Shemhazai led a group of his angels to earth to instruct mankind in the ways of piety and righteousness. After a time, the angels became prey to earthly desires and began to lust after the daughters of man, and thus they fell. They instructed their mortal mates in the arts of conjuration, summoning, necromancy and other magickal arts. The fruits of their union are the Nephilim: possessed of superhuman strength, cunning, and infinite capacity, and hunger for, sin. Venerated as heroes by some, vilified by most, the Nephilim eventually annihilated one another in a cataclysmic civil war instigated by the angel Gabriel as punishment for their transgressions.

    Holy frankincense and hyssop in union with earthy fig, defiled by black patchouli and vetiver, with a chaotic infusion of lavender, cardamom, tamarind, rosemary, oakmoss and cypress.

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  • Parthenope

    Honeysuckle, orris, moss, musk, benzoin, oakmoss, and star jasmine.

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  • Pater Populi

    The foundation of a stable and just society, the keeper of tradition, the enforcer of laws:  bay leaf and olive blossom with ambrette seed, white oakmoss, petitgrain, lavender, cedar, and leather.

    Out of Stock
  • Proverbs 24:11-12

    Rescue those who are being taken away to death; hold back those who are stumbling to the slaughter. If you say, “Behold, we did not know this,” does not he who weighs the heart perceive it? Does not he who keeps watch over your soul know it, and will he not repay man according to his work?

    Blackened oudh, leather, labdanum, and oakmoss.

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  • Samhainophobia

    The Fear of Halloween

    Menacing Haitian vetiver, patchouli, and clove with a shock of bourbon geranium, grim oakmoss, and dread-inspiring balsams pierce the innocuous scent of autumn leaves.

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  • Sapphics

    All the night sleep came not upon my eyelids,
    Shed not dew, nor shook nor unclosed a feather,
    Yet with lips shut close and with eyes of iron
    Stood and beheld me.

    Then to me so lying awake a vision
    Came without sleep over the seas and touched me,
    Softly touched mine eyelids and lips; and I too,
    Full of the vision,

    Saw the white implacable Aphrodite,
    Saw the hair unbound and the feet unsandalled
    Shine as fire of sunset on western waters;
    Saw the reluctant

    Feet, the straining plumes of the doves that drew her,
    Looking always, looking with necks reverted,
    Back to Lesbos, back to the hills whereunder
    Shone Mitylene;

    Heard the flying feet of the Loves behind her
    Make a sudden thunder upon the waters,
    As the thunder flung from the strong unclosing
    Wings of a great wind.

    So the goddess fled from her place, with awful
    Sound of feet and thunder of wings around her;
    While behind a clamour of singing women
    Severed the twilight.

    Ah the singing, ah the delight, the passion!
    All the Loves wept, listening; sick with anguish,
    Stood the crowned nine Muses about Apollo;
    Fear was upon them,

    While the tenth sang wonderful things they knew not.
    Ah the tenth, the Lesbian! the nine were silent,
    None endured the sound of her song for weeping;
    Laurel by laurel,

    Faded all their crowns; but about her forehead,
    Round her woven tresses and ashen temples
    White as dead snow, paler than grass in summer,
    Ravaged with kisses,

    Shone a light of fire as a crown for ever.
    Yea, almost the implacable Aphrodite
    Paused, and almost wept; such a song was that song.
    Yea, by her name too

    Called her, saying, “Turn to me, O my Sappho;”
    Yet she turned her face from the Loves, she saw not
    Tears for laughter darken immortal eyelids,
    Heard not about her

    Fearful fitful wings of the doves departing,
    Saw not how the bosom of Aphrodite
    Shook with weeping, saw not her shaken raiment,
    Saw not her hands wrung;

    Saw the Lesbians kissing across their smitten
    Lutes with lips more sweet than the sound of lute-strings,
    Mouth to mouth and hand upon hand, her chosen,
    Fairer than all men;

    Only saw the beautiful lips and fingers,
    Full of songs and kisses and little whispers,
    Full of music; only beheld among them
    Soar, as a bird soars

    Newly fledged, her visible song, a marvel,
    Made of perfect sound and exceeding passion,
    Sweetly shapen, terrible, full of thunders,
    Clothed with the wind’s wings.

    Then rejoiced she, laughing with love, and scattered
    Roses, awful roses of holy blossom;
    Then the Loves thronged sadly with hidden faces
    Round Aphrodite,

    Then the Muses, stricken at heart, were silent;
    Yea, the gods waxed pale; such a song was that song.
    All reluctant, all with a fresh repulsion,
    Fled from before her.

    All withdrew long since, and the land was barren,
    Full of fruitless women and music only.
    Now perchance, when winds are assuaged at sunset,
    Lulled at the dewfall,

    By the grey sea-side, unassuaged, unheard of,
    Unbeloved, unseen in the ebb of twilight,
    Ghosts of outcast women return lamenting,
    Purged not in Lethe,

    Clothed about with flame and with tears, and singing
    Songs that move the heart of the shaken heaven,
    Songs that break the heart of the earth with pity,
    Hearing, to hear them.
    —Algernon Charles Swinburne

    Tonka, oakmoss, tolu balsam, grey amber, myrrh, and muguet.

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  • Schrodinger’s Cat

    One can even set up quite ridiculous cases. A cat is penned up in a steel chamber, along with the following diabolical device (which must be secured against direct interference by the cat): in a Geiger counter there is a tiny bit of radioactive substance, so small that perhaps in the course of one hour one of the atoms decays, but also, with equal probability, perhaps none; if it happens, the counter tube discharges and through a relay releases a hammer which shatters a small flask of hydrocyanic acid. If one has left this entire system to itself for an hour, one would say that the cat still lives if meanwhile no atom has decayed. The first atomic decay would have poisoned it. The Psi function for the entire system would express this by having in it the living and the dead cat (pardon the expression) mixed or smeared out in equal parts. It is typical of these cases that an indeterminacy originally restricted to the atomic domain becomes transformed into macroscopic indeterminacy, which can then be resolved by direct observation. That prevents us from so naively accepting as valid a “blurred model” for representing reality. In itself it would not embody anything unclear or contradictory. There is a difference between a shaky or out-of-focus photograph and a snapshot of clouds and fog banks.

    A paradoxical scent experiment! – tangerine, sugared lime, pink grapefruit, oakmoss, lavender, zdravetz, and chocolate peppermint.

    No cats were mistreated during the formulation of this paradox, or in the process of creating this perfume.

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  • Tennis Match

    Crushed grass, dandelion sap, green oakmoss, lettuce leaf, and white pepper.

    Out of Stock
  • The Creation of Lilith

    I took this photo of Lilith a few days ago. I told her that it looks like her and Pickle are reenacting Michelangelo’s Creation of Adam, and I show her a pic. She asks what’s going on in it, so I explain the image, and she says… “Well, that’s friggin sexist. It’s stupid to say that boys were created first and to make a whole painting about it. Plus there’s no girls in the photo, and not everyone has boy or girl parts. It’s sexist, and I hate it.”

    That was a much, much stronger reaction than I expected, but good on you, kid. Burn the patriarchy down.

    And Elohim created Adam in His Image, in the Image of God He created him; male and female He created them. The first woman, created with Adam, in all her darkness and all her light: sweet black pomegranate, French lavender, oakmoss, ti leaf, bakhoor oudh incense, and black fig.

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  • The Cross

    The integration of spirit with the material world: frankincense, styrax, oakmoss, patchouli, and birch tar.

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  • The Day Burned White

    Using the door, which was centrally placed in the wall like a mouth, the artists had sprayed a single, vast head onto the stripped plaster. The painting was more adroit than most she had seen, rife with detail that lent the image an unsettling veracity. The cheekbones jutting through skin the color of buttermilk; the teeth, sharpened to irregular points, all converging on the door. The sitter’s eyes were, owing to the room’s low ceiling, set mere inches above the upper lip, but this physical adjustment only lent force to the image, giving the impression that he had thrown his head back. Knotted strands of his hair snaked from his scalp across the ceiling. Was it a portrait? There was something naggingly specific in the details of the brows and the lines around the wide mouth; in the careful picturing of those vicious teeth. A nightmare certainly: a facsimile, perhaps, of something from a heroin fugue. Whatever its origins, it was potent. Even the illusion of door-as-mouth worked. The short passageway between living room and bedroom offered a passable throat, with a tattered lamp in lieu of tonsils. Beyond the gullet, the day burned white in the nightmare’s belly. The whole effect brought to mind a ghost train painting. The same heroic deformity, the same unashamed intention to scare. And it worked; she stood in the bedroom almost stupefied by the picture, its red-rimmed eyes fixing her mercilessly.

    Plaster and spraypaint, mottled with buttermilk – sweet, chalky, and edging on sickly. White and golden amber beams of daylight pour through the belly of the scent, while oakmoss and Spanish moss add a touch of decay.

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  • The Ghost of a Ghost’s Ghost

    Now, suppose this is to be accepted as the rational and scientific explanation of all the phenomena of this order which have been observed since the human race began to conserve records of its own experience. To what conclusion should we be logically forced? The believe in the objective reality of apparitions under such conditions would have to make way for a new conception, but the point which is really at issue between the materialist and the spiritualist would remain untouched. That issue relates to the permanence of the human personality after death. The spiritualist will point you to his own experiences as affording evidence of the permanence of personality. The materialist is certain that all the experiences of which the spiritualist is conscious result from the operation of natural law. But the eternal question of the soul – “Am I an immortal thing?” – is not to be decided either by the proof of the existence of whole armies of ghosts, or by the rational explanation of all apparitional phenomena whatsoever. The spiritualist falls into an easy error in the supposition that a continuance of personality on a new plane implies a permanence of continuity. What guarantee has a ghost of being immortal? Me not he also perish out of his appointed sphere? And why might we not fancy a whole procession of lives in phantom state – each more ghostly, more attenuated than its forerunner – the ghost of a man, the ghost of a man’s ghost, the ghost of a “ghost’s” ghost, until the thin thing fades into nonentity and slips back into the universal element? The materialist falls into an error parallel with that of the spiritualist when he conceives that a rational explanation of all ghostly phenomena has disposed of a belief in immortality. The concept is as independent of evidence, and as unsupportable by evidence as it is indestructible by evidence. We can neither prove nor disprove, but the balance of reason is still upon the side of the believer and it favours strongly the hope of a continued existence and a continued growth. We can but argue from things known. In all nature we find the clearest evidence of law of progress.
    – the Occult Review, January 1905

    Falling into nonentity and slipping back into the universal element: pallid oakmoss and earthy patchouli tumbling into a void of misty lavender, cistus, and white agarwood.

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  • The Grave-Pig

    We must have all the old demons of the first class, with tails, and the hobgoblins and imps; and then I think we ought not to leave out the death-horse, or the grave-pig, or even the church dwarf, although they do belong to the clergy, and are not reckoned among our people; but that is merely their office, they are nearly related to us, and visit us very frequently. 

    Fig, oakmoss, mushroom caps, and patchouli.

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  • The Harlot’s House

    We caught the tread of dancing feet,
    We loitered down the moonlit street,
    And stopped beneath the harlot’s house.

    Inside, above the din and fray,
    We heard the loud musicians play
    The “Treues Liebes Herz” of Strauss.

    Like strange mechanical grotesques,
    Making fantastic arabesques,
    The shadows raced across the blind.

    We watched the ghostly dancers spin
    To sound of horn and violin,
    Like black leaves wheeling in the wind.

    Like wire-pulled automatons,
    Slim silhouetted skeletons
    Went sidling through the slow quadrille.

    The took each other by the hand,
    And danced a stately saraband;
    Their laughter echoed thin and shrill.

    Sometimes a clockwork puppet pressed
    A phantom lover to her breast,
    Sometimes they seemed to try to sing.

    Sometimes a horrible marionette
    Came out, and smoked its cigarette
    Upon the steps like a live thing.

    Then, turning to my love, I said,
    “The dead are dancing with the dead,
    The dust is whirling with the dust.”

    But she–she heard the violin,
    And left my side, and entered in:
    Love passed into the house of lust.

    Then suddenly the tune went false,
    The dancers wearied of the waltz,
    The shadows ceased to wheel and whirl.

    And down the long and silent street,
    The dawn, with silver-sandalled feet,
    Crept like a frightened girl.

    The dead are dancing with the dead, the dust is whirling with the dust: angel’s trumpet, violet, white sandalwood, oude, copaiba balsam, angelica, white tea, olibanum, and oakmoss.

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  • The King’s Daughter

    There were a prince and a princess sitting by a stream in a wooded valley. Their seven servants had set up a scarlet canopy beneath a tree, and the royal young couple ate a box lunch to the accompaniment of lutes and theorbos. They hardly spoke a word to one another until they had finished the meal, and then the princess sighed and said, “Well, I suppose I’d best get the silly business over with.” The prince began to read a magazine.

    “You might at least –” said the princess, but the prince kept on reading. The princess made a sign to two of the servants, who began to play an older music on their lutes. Then she took a few steps on the grass, held up a bridle bright as butter, and called, “Here, unicorn, here! Here, my pretty, here to me! Comecomecomecomecome!”

    The prince snickered. “It’s not your chickens you’re calling, you know,” he remarked without looking up. “Why don’t you sing something, instead of clucking like that?”

    “Well, I’m doing the best I can,” the princess cried. “I’ve never called one of these things before.” But after a little silence, she began to sing.

    I am a king’s daughter,
    And if I cared to care,
    The moon that has no mistress
    Would flutter in my hair.
    No one dares to cherish
    What I choose to crave.
    Never have I hungered,
    That I did not have.

    I am a king’s daughter,
    And I grow old within
    The prison of my person,
    The shackles of my skin.
    And I would run away
    And beg from door to door,
    Just to see your shadow
    Once, and never more.

    So she sang, and sang again, and then she called, “Nice unicorn, pretty, pretty, pretty,” for a little longer, and then she said angrily, “Well, I’ve done as much as I’ll do. I’m going home.”

    The prince yawned and folded his magazine. “You satisfied custom well enough,” he told her, “and no one expected more than that. It was just a formality. Now we can be married.”

    “Yes,” the princess said, “now we can be married.” The servants began to pack everything away again, while the two with the lutes played joyous wedding music. The princess’s voice was a little sad and defiant as she said, “If there really were such things as unicorns, one would have come to me. I called as sweetly as anyone could, and I had the golden bridle. And of course I am pure and untouched.”

    “For all of me, you are,” the prince answered indifferently. “As I say, you satisfy custom. You don’t satisfy my father, but then neither do I. That would take a unicorn.” He was tall, and his face was as soft and pleasant as a marshmallow.

    When they and their retinue were gone, the unicorn came out of the wood, followed by Molly and the magician, and took up her journey again. A long time later, wandering in another country where there were no streams and nothing green, Molly asked her why she had not gone to the princess’s song. Schmendrick drew near to listen to the answer, though he stayed on his side of the unicorn. He never walked on Molly’s side.

    The unicorn said, “That king’s daughter would never have run away to see my shadow. If I had shown myself, and she had known me, she would have been more frightened than if she had seen a dragon, for no one makes promises to a dragon. I remember that once it never mattered to me whether or not princesses meant what they sang. I went to them all and laid my head in their laps, and a few of them rode on my back, though most were afraid. But I have no time for them now, princesses or kitchenmaids. I have no time.”

    A matter of formality: lilac musk, sandalwood, sweet pea, watermelon accord, pale woods, elemi, and oakmoss.

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  • The Last Unicorn

    The unicorn lived in a lilac wood, and she lived all alone. She was very old, though she did not know it, and she was no longer the careless color of sea foam, but rather the color of snow falling on a moonlit night. But her eyes were still clear and unwearied, and she still moved like a shadow on the sea.

    Frosty lilac petals, iris pallida root, orris, violet leaf, white chocolate, coconut, wild lettuce, white sandalwood, and oakmoss.

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  • The Stranger

    The unknown factor, the outsider entering your town uninvited, unannounced, and unknown: a narcotic black chypre with crushed violets, indigo lilac, patchouli, oakmoss absolute, labdanum, and clove.

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  • Vivid Enjoyment of the Memory of Rupture

    Rice milk, white ginger, oakmoss, ti leaf, and cardamom pod.

    Out of Stock
  • Zombi

    Dried roses, rose leaf, Spanish moss, oakmoss and deep brown earth.

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